P.G. Drunken Brunch of the Month, Take 1

Posted: February 10, 2010 | Author: Rita | Filed under: brunch, Rita | Tags: , , , | 3 Comments »

As much as I love my fellow Pretty Girls, we don’t see each other so often, what with each of our hectic schedules and vastly different neighborhoods we reside in. Most of us might be in the same city, but that doesn’t mean it’s so easy to get together! As Johanna mentioned, regularly hanging out is a new goal of ours, and thus the first ever Pretty Girls Drunken Brunch of the Month was born. If anyone can do homemade brunch, it’s us!

For the inaugural edition I decided to use a gravalax recipe I’ve had for over a year but never found the right occasion to make it until now. Joh made scandalously good bagels and green pepper jelly and Bakezilla brought the prosecco and juices; a perfect trifecta of brunch.

I’ll leave it to her how she actually made such wondrous, bready delights but you can certainly have my gravalax recipe! It came out great, especially considering I’d never made it before!

Gravalax
- 1/4 filet salmon (it doesn’t have to be the highest quality, necessarily)
- 1/4 cup kosher salt
- 1/4 cup sugar
- Handfuls of dill
- 1/2 tsp all spice (optional but recommended)
- Slices of fresh ginger or 1 tsp ground ginger (optional but recommended)
- Freshly ground black pepper

Debone the salmon, if necessary. Set aside. In a bowl, add the salt, sugar and optional spices together. Rub both sides of the filet with the salt mix. If there is skin, just rub the exposed side, or remove the skin and do both if preferred. Garnish each side with pepper and smother each side with dill, enough to cover the sides completely. Slice the salmon in half and fold together. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap then place in a ziplock bag and refrigerate for 48 hours minimum. The salmon should be weighted down and turned over every 12 hours. When it’s done, rinse off and pat dry with a paper towel. Slice, serve.

After all of us eating almost a dozen bagels fresh out of the oven, the entire plate of gravalax and consuming the whole bottle of prosecco, for having great times with friends on a lazy, brunchy Sunday, I deem the first round of PGDB to be a success!


Anti-food and Yom Kippur

Posted: September 26, 2009 | Author: Rita | Filed under: Rita | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

After sunset in a couple of days, Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year on the Jewish calendar begins and for the next twenty-five hours there will be no eating or drinking of any kind by Jews all over the world. Fast days, quite literally, are anti-food: in order to ritualistically purify ourselves for the day we have to elevate ourselves spiritually by temporarily denying ourselves unnecessary bodily activities we enjoy, like eating; snacking on cake or samosas, say, won’t put anyone in the right mindset of atoning for a year’s worth of sins. Bakezilla’s samosas however: I’d sin for those any day. Not eating is a method of focusing ourselves, of not being concerned with our regular day-to-day lives but setting that aside in order to concentrate on more spiritual matters and also to be uncomfortable. It is the Day of Atonement after all, who said it had to be comfortable?

As far as I’m aware, there are no particular foods directly associated with either the before or after of Yom Kippur, but there are some guidelines on what to eat beforehand in order to make the fast be as easy as possible.

The first tip requires a little advance planning. If you’re a coffee freak like me, you will definitely want to cut down or wean yourself completely in the weeks before YK. If in general you’re a bleary-eyed, grumbling ogre in the pre-caffinated AM, then that ain’t how you want to be on the day that there is zero you can do about it. Also, coffee withdrawal gives many people headaches, so cutting down from three cups to two, one or none might be annoying at first but you’ll thank yourself later and you can always pick the habit back up the morning after anyway.

Ok, so now your veins are more blood than caffeine. Congrats! Next, you will want to increase your water intake. Drinking more water than usual will keep your body more hydrated (duh) but since you’re not allowed to sip even water on YK, the more your body has to work with in advance, the easier it’s going to be to not pass out from dehydration, especially if celebrating the holiday in a hot, humid place like Florida, which is what I’m doing. Note: I have never passed out from dehydration on YK but some friends of mine have come close, so watch out!

Alright, so far you’ve re-proportioned your coffee and water intake. Say the fast starts this evening and pre-YK dinner is late this afternoon. Pop quiz: what do you make for dinner? If you said huge juicy steak and fries with lots of ketchup and hot sauce you would be… dead wrong! But that sounds really tasty. No, the trick to a successful fast is to eat light and unsalty foods the night before. One of the worst feelings in the world is toddling along with a brick in your stomach from eating too-heavy foods but you have things to do and all you want to do is sleep it off and you’re not allowed! In addition, salty things such as fries (delicious, delicious fries) will make you want to drink lots of water, which you won’t be able to do once the fast starts.

So, what do you eat before a fast?

In my experience, the best preparatory dinner is a salad plus something dairy, perhaps a quiche or pasta dish. Nothing too sweet or any baked goods for dessert, best is fruit, which won’t make you as thirsty.

As it turns out, this type of meal is what you’ll want for the break-fast as well. A lot of people eat bagels with lox and cream cheese once YK is over, because even though you’re starving you’re not going to have the energy to weigh yourself down with any heavy foods.

In honor of Yom Kippur, here’s a recipe for gravalax that you can serve with bagels and cream cheese at your break-fast or at your next DIY brunch.

Gravalax

Note: requires 48 hours of advance prep. You can use inexpensive salmon for this recipe; if it’s too expensive you might as well buy prepared lox!

Ingredients:
- Fillet of salmon (debone beforehand) – can use only 1/4 of a fillet depending on amount of people to serve
- 1/4 cup of kosher salt
- 1/4 cup sugar
- Couple of bunches of fresh dill, enough to cover one side of fillet
- 1/2 tsp all spice (optional)
- Slice of fresh ginger (optional)
- Fresh pepper

In a bowl, combine salt and spices. Rub both sides of the salmon fillet with the spice mix. If the salmon has its skin, just rub the exposed side. Garnish with fresh pepper and smother it with dill. Slice the fillet in half and fold it together. Wrap the salmon tightly with plastic wrap and place in a ziplock or other airtight bag. Store it in the fridge for 48 hours, minimum, with a weight on top to press down on it, turning it every 12 hours. After refrigeration, rinse off the fillet, pat it dry, slice and serve.

Enjoy!



Johanna: The Improviser

Never quite follows the recipe. Doesn't really measure. Tastes with her fingers. Somehow, it always works.

Alyssa: The Triple Threat

Can do it all. And modest to boot.

Bakezilla: We Use Mixers Too

She likes to bake. Actually, baking is the only thing she does. It's a passion.

Rita: The Kosher Chick

Restrictions have nothing on her.